02 Jan 2015

Events - Camp@Home




Twice a year during the summer breaks of the Northern and Southern hemisphere, we organise Camp@Home: a three-day camp organised specially for the kids to check out Singapore when they are back for the holidays. 
Your child will get to explore Singapore’s history and embark on a journey which will introduce him/her to Singapore’s rich multi-racial, multi-cultural and multi-religious heritage. Fun, interactive and educational, your child will also get the chance to spend a day in a local primary school and be immersed in Singapore’s education scene and make local friends.
Camp@Home is open to children aged 7 to 12 years old, holding Singapore citizenship or whose parents are both Singapore citizens.

Camp@Home 2016 (20 - 22 July)

Planning a trip back to Singapore with your family this summer? Sign your kids up for Camp@Home from 20 – 22 July 2016! Camp@Home is a three-day non-residential programme specially designed for overseas Singaporean children aged 7 to 12 years old. Our little campers will participate in learning journeys through Singapore’s various historical and ethnic districts, where they will learn about Singapore’s rich heritage and multi-racial diversity! They will also spend a day at a local primary school where they will get to make new friends from home!
Registration for Camp@Home 2016 is now open. Sign up today at

Camp@Home 2015 (22 - 24 July and 3 - 5 August 2015)

The July and August 2015 editions of Camp@Home commemorated SG50 by celebrating all things Singaporean. Apart from paying visit to Singapore’s heartlands and ethnic neighbourhoods, and spending a day at a primary school, a number of exciting SG50-themed activities were specially designed to involve our campers in the revelry of our homeland’s Golden Jubilee.

From appreciating the lush greenery of the National Orchid Garden, to making soaps bearing images of national icons, and participating in an interactive re-telling of beloved local folktales, the campers experienced for themselves Singapore’s cultural depth and diversity. In a simple expression of their well-wishes, the campers also attempted a human SG50 formation. Through the campers’ combined efforts, the formation was completed in no time (and little sweat) – the final outcome a demonstration of the campers’ teamwork and compliments to Singapore!

Read more about the July and August 2015 editions of Camp@Home here, and check out photos from the camps on our Facebook page!

Camp@Home 2015 (12 - 14 January 2015)

Our first camp of 2015 had our overseas Singaporean campers come together to kickstart Singapore’s 50th birthday celebrations. The campers had the opportunity to batik paint local icons to commemorate this momentous year. Although batik painting was previously unheard of to most campers, everyone relished the opportunity to explore this new medium. Each camper clearly had his or her own favourite icon of Singapore—the Merlion, an SMRT train, and even Singa the Lion was spotted!

The campers were given the three primary colours of blue, yellow, and red to work with. As the campers mixed the batik paints, they marvelled at the multitude of vibrant hues they could create. The batik painting session was a fun and leisurely way for our campers to reflect on what they held dear about their homeland. At the end of the session the campers brightly held up their masterpieces for their fellow friends to see. With each camper’s completed painting splashed with bold and brilliant colours, it was quite a sight to behold— and certainly, a fitting tribute to Singapore and her colourful heritage! Read all about the campers' experiences here, and check out photos from this edition of Camp@Home on our Overseas Singaporean Facebook page!

Camp@Home 2014 (23 - 25 July and 4 - 6 August 2014)

The turnout for the July 2014 camp was our largest yet, and we are overwhelmed by your enthusiastic participation! Once again, our young overseas Singaporean children had the opportunity to learn a little more about their homeland, Singapore, through a host of educational and fun-filled activities.

The July camp had our campers manifest their crafty side, all in the name of good fun of course. The “We Love SG Flowers” campaign had our campers come together to fold beautiful flowers from plastic bags for the Chingay festival in 2015, as well as Singapore’s upcoming 50th birthday. The plastic flowers held great symbolic meaning, as it represented the children’s love and aspirations towards Singapore.

The August edition of the camp saw our campers giving back to the community via the Boys’ Brigade Share-A-Gift project. The children were tasked to pack food rations into bags, for distribution to the elderly. Through teamwork the little campers demonstrated that little hands can make big work (and a big difference), as the bags of food were packed and given out to the households in no time! More importantly, it was an especially meaningful afternoon for our overseas Singaporean children, as they gained insight into the lives of less-fortunate Singaporeans and learnt about the spirit of giving. Read about it here.

Check out photos of our campers from the July and August camps on Facebook, and relive the fun and action of Camp@Home!

Camp@Home 2014 (15 - 17 January) 

Yet another round of fun, laughter and enriching activities! We thank you for your kind support and your children’s participation! Check out the photos of all the fun activities on our Facebook page!

Camp@Home 2013 (17 - 19 July & 5 - 7 August) 

Thank you, overseas Singaporean parents, for your kind support and your children's participation in yet another successful run of Camp @ Home. Do also check out photos and videos on Facebook (Jul & Aug) and Youtube to find out more about our previous editions!

 Camp@Home 2013 (6-8 Feb)

The season for play, adventure and exploration is back! Get ready to clear out your children's calendars and have them embark on a colourful journey when they are back home.

Click on the Quick Links on the side bar and check out our photos and videos on Flickr, Facebook and Youtube to find out more about Camp@Home Feb 2013.

Join Durion the lion, on his quest to discover more about Singapore’s multi-racial, multi-cultural and multi-religious heritage in this stop-motion video clip.

Explore Little India, the Civic District, museums and many other places. Enjoy the sights, tastes and smells of Singapore at Camp@Home, especially created for our overseas Singaporean children.

Camp@Home 2012 Jan & Jul Editions


We thank you sincerely from  the bottom of our hearts for the amazing response we received this time. For those who were not able to make it this time, sign up with us on our Portal to be the first to receive notifications on our upcoming events. So stay connected!

Click on the Quick Links on the side bar and check out our photos and videos on FlickrFacebook and YouTube to find out more about the Camp@Home 2012 January and July editions.



The First Camp@Home for Overseas Singaporean Children

The first day of the camp saw kids learning more about the Singapore flag, the meaning of the national anthem and how to take the pledge. Said Eddie Tay, Titus’ father: “He finally learns the national anthem. I heard him sing it for the first time.” Titus has been away from Singapore for the past three years. Some children, like Marcus, are born overseas and hardly have the opportunity to learn more about Singapore. 
Shortly after the pledge-taking, the kids were on their feet for a heritage trail where they visited places like Civilian Memorial Wall, Tan Kim Seng Fountain, Cenotaph, Lim Bo Seng Memorial, etc. The kids had to complete the challenges at every pit stop before they could proceed to the next. At the Tan Kim Seng Fountain, they were given two water containers – one that is four-litre and the other a three. They had to figure out how to get two litres of water using the two containers given. 
The children then took a trip to the Malay Village where they learnt about the Malay wedding ritual and played Malay kampong games. The once unfamiliar words like chongkak, kuti-kuti, batu serembat rang a bell at the end of the first day. 
Day Two started early in the morning when the kids went for a one-day immersion programme at Queenstown Primary School. Coincidentally, it was Racial Harmony Day and the school was inundated with colours as teachers and students came in traditional costumes of the 4 main races in Singapore. The children, accompanied by their buddies from Queenstown Primary School, then sat in the different classes to have a taste of classroom learning. Said Christina Tong, the mother of Calista Chong: “The one day in school lets them (the children) experience what the Singapore school is like and compare it to where they are studying overseas. I think it’s a very different experience for them.”
The one-day immersion would, of course, be incomplete without the Information Communications Technology session, given Singapore’s push to equip students with IT know-how. The kids were also introduced to the Children’s Corner at the OSU portal. The corner contains interactive activities and games to arouse the children’s interest about Singapore and to keep them connected to the country. It also contains resources and links that allow parents to keep their children in touch with developments at home. The children then checked out the learning portal of Queenstown Primary School before joining the different co-curriculum activity groups like badminton, soccer, Boys’ Brigade. 
Day Three was replete with hands-on activities like moon-cake making, lantern-decorating and henna-painting. The kids were most privileged on Day Four to attend this year’s National Day Parade National Education Show. The children got all excited when the military display came on. A S-70B Sikorsky naval helicopter, a high mobility artillery rocket system, an unmanned surface vessel and a multi-utility vehicle left them in awe, as did the sight of the six divers from the Republic of Singapore navy jumping off the Chinook into the Marina Bay in full combat gear. The fireworks – a perennial crowd favourite – were a breath-taking sight. The night sky, painted with colours of red, blue and green, concluded the four-day camp literally and emotionally on a ‘high’ note.
Many enjoyed the camp. Stella Buck, Marcus’ mother recounted her son’s experience: “He’s very excited. He discovered something new because usually in our daily lives, we don’t talk about how Singaporeans live.” Even the ones who were initially sceptical did a U-turn. Shared 11-year-old Fei Ewald: “Usually camps are kind of annoying for me, but it turned out to be a good experience.”
To view the photos of the kids at camp, click here.




Read the stories of Singaporeans living overseas.